The Canadian Standing Ctte on Justice & Human Rights: 19th Report

Recommendation 1

The Committee recommends that more resources be allocated to crime prevention and diversion programs for individuals with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

Recommendation 2

The Committee recommends that the federal government work with the provinces and territories to encourage the development of a fetal alcohol spectrum disorder awareness campaign targeting the general public and specific populations vulnerable to FASD.

Recommendation 3

The Committee recommends that Royal Canadian Mounted Police and Correctional Service Canada officers receive training on fetal alcohol spectrum disorder as part of their standard training.

Recommendation 4

The Committee recommends that Correctional Service Canada continue to evaluate community-based best practices to screen offenders for FASD and that FASD be built into the existing mental health evaluation upon admission to a penitentiary.

Recommendation 5

The Committee recommends that Correctional Service Canada consider strategies to help the integration and rehabilitation of individuals with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder who are sentenced to two years or more in prison.

Recommendation 6

The Committee recommends that the federal government work with the provinces and territories, and key stakeholders such as the Canada FASD Research Network, to support innovative research to improve our understanding of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder; inform us about the disorder’s risk factors and protective factors; and help improve health outcomes.

Nothing about the need for diagnostic services.
But it will keep a lot of people busy. How can a person benefit from these recommendations if they do not have a diagnosis?

“Diagnosis, the Heart of the Medical Art Diagnosis is the heart of the medical art; it is what separates medicine as a definite, rational science from medical magic and superstition. Diagnosis is also the central, golden link in the chain of medical knowledge that brings together all its theoretical aspects to provide the practical key to treatment. Diagnosis, to be accurate and sound, must be built upon a broad yet definite base of knowledge regarding all aspects of human anatomy, physiology and pathology.”